It’s hard to believe that I’ve kept at this project for two years. There have been numerous occasions where I thought I wouldn’t, or couldn’t continue—that I had nothing more to add, or that I’d tired of the restrictions I’d chosen for myself. But this project has been such a great relief to return to each time.

Now, at the two year mark, I’m curious where this work will take me next. I hope you will join me in finding out.

L

See also: Shifting Attractors and The Echo.

See also: Shapes in Echoes.

See also: Grand Loves and Action, Reaction.

"Be in it, in it."—A

See also: As It Is, Highs and Lows and Misshapen Mirror.

"The limbic brain is an emotional magnet. Attractors activate compatible aspects of relatedness and emotionality in others, leaving dormant the incompatible pebbles. We all embody an emotional force field that acts on the people we love, evoking the relationship attributes we know best. Our minds are in turn pulled by the emotional magnets of those close to us, transforming any landscape we happen to contemplate and painting it with the colors and textures they see."

"If psychotherapy exerts its healing touch through limbic connections, one wonders, why aren’t other attachments curative? If he were willing to put in the time—why couldn’t a spouse, friend, bartender, or bowling partner guide a lost soul into a healthier emotional world?

The matter is one of probability rather than destiny. A person who needs limbic revision possesses pathologic Attractors. Everyone who comes within range feels at least some of the unhappiness inherent in his world, and that intimation repels many potentially healthy partners. Those who stay often do so because they recognize a pattern from their own pasts. For them it is a siren song. Relatedness engenders a brand loyalty that beer companies would kill for: your own relationship style entices. Others are wearisome and, in short order, unpalatable. Thus people who bond share unspoken assumptions about how love works, and if the Attractors underlying those premises need changing, they are frequently the last people in the world who can help each other.”—Thomas Lewis, M. D., Fari Amini, M.D., and Richard Lannon, M.D., A General Theory of Love

See also: The Touch, Contour Variations, The Echo, Symmetrical Flaw and Hot and Cold.

See also: MirroringSelves and Becoming Whole.

"… this is my 2nd anniversary with my partner, so in my mind it’s the beginning of a replicable cycle. It’s like our first not new anniversary, you know? At the same time things in our lives are still new and uncertain and I guess despite all of that having my partner around is a great comfort and constant. So yeah there’s a lot of different feelings, a cyclical feeling, a feeling of uncertainty and change, a feeling of hope, and a feeling of constancy. 

I love how your work expresses these tensions—of fondness and distance, of gaining and loosing, of push and pull, of reason and emotion, of the change in sentiment over time. If anything I say resonates with you, it would mean a lot to me if it helped your work in any way. I would love to share it with my partner.”—Jessica

"… the more it changes, the more it’s the same thing. Change is in some sense an illusion, for we are always at the point where any future can take us!"—Alan Watts

You have crazy insight. The way you perceive things is incredible. Sometimes I imagine things, objects, people, relations, connections just as a world of pure energy flows and singularities (what it actually really is, but not how we construct reality). I like what you do because all these wave patterns remind me of that. You help me see it, materialize it.

Thanks, Jean-Sébastien. I think you are right. I’m endlessly curious about what the unseeable, but intuitively palpable, might look like to us.

I’ve recently started to read a little more and have begun keeping a reading journal—one of the books I just finished has made an explanation for what you are describing based on brain physiology. It’s deeply exciting to me to see where the various areas of science takes us in the next several years, and how it meshes with what has always been known to be true in art and philosophy.

You
In autumn of 2013, I asked five love interests whom I had met in the last 2.5 years to follow a dexterity exercise I designed. They are shown here in the order of, and preceded by the date on which I met them.
Watch the video
Happy Valentine’s Day,
L

You

In autumn of 2013, I asked five love interests whom I had met in the last 2.5 years to follow a dexterity exercise I designed. They are shown here in the order of, and preceded by the date on which I met them.

Watch the video

Happy Valentine’s Day,

L